Alphabetical List

A      
 
Peter Achermann

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Prof. Dr. sc.nat. Peter Achermann
Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zurich

acherman@pharma.uzh.ch
Research Focus: Our research interests are sleep, sleep regulation and circadian rhythms with a focus on mathematical modeling and biosignal analysis and effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields on brain activity. In collaboration with clinicians, we also investigate altered sleep regulation in patients. Our current focus is on resting state networks and sleep regulation, sleep onset and other state transitions, functional and effective connectivity between brain networks during sleep, automatic artifact detection, and continuous monitoring of brain state changes (e.g. detection of microsleep episodes)

Keywords: sleep and sleep regulation, circadian rhythms, mathematical modeling and biosignal analysis, imaging of sleep
Topics:
Sleep and Sleep Disorders, Computation and Modeling
Projects: project data bank UZH

Publications: researcherid.com  scholargoogle.ch

Website:  http://www.pharma.uzh.ch/research/chronobiology/areas/sleepbiology.html

 

      

 

 
   
aguzzi

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  Prof. Dr. Adriano Aguzzi
Institute of Neuropathology, University Hospital Zurich
adriano.aguzzi@usz.ch

Research Focus: We have devoted the past 20 years to studying the immunological and molecular basis of prion pathogenesis. Currently, the primary focus of the lab lies on elucidating mechanisms underlying a) replication of prions and prion-like proteins such as alpha-synuclein and b) neurotoxicity in prion diseases. We approach these objectives from different directions. On one hand, we have established highly automated platforms for cell-based assays in order to screen for genes that are important for either prion replication or toxicity. On the other hand, we use a variety of model systems for genetic and infectious prion disease including cell culture models such as human IPS-cell derived neurons, ex vivo brain slice cultures and various transgenic and knockout mouse models in order to investigate molecular pathways underlying prion toxicity and pathogenesis.

Keywords: Neurodegeneration, neurotoxicity, prion disease, organotypic brain slice cultures, generation of transgenic and knock-out mouse models, high-throughput screenings

Topic: Disorders of the Nervous System

Publications:http://www.zora.uzh.ch/view/subjectsnew/10208.html

https://scholar.google.com

Website: http://www.en.neuropathologie.usz.ch/

 

 

   

Ametamey

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Prof. Dr. Simon M. Ametamey

Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Animal Imaging Center-PET, ETH Zurich
simon.ametamey@pharma.ethz.ch

Research Focus: Research in our group focuses on the development of positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases in the central nervous system (CNS). Specific research activities include the glutamatergic and the cannabinoid neurotransmission systems. Several established CNS PET ligands are also routinely synthesized and applied for drug development and studying brain functions.

Keywords: PET radioligand, in vivo imaging, drug development, glutamatergic and cannabinoid neurotransmission systems

Topic: Biomedical Technology and Imaging

Publications: pubmed

Website: http://www.radiopharmaceutical-science.ethz.ch

 

   
Irmgard Amrein

 

PD Dr. Irmgard Amrein
Division of Functional Neuroanatomy, Institute of Anatomy, University of Zurich

i.amrein@anatom.uzh.ch

Research focus: We investigate eco-evolutionary adaptations in the structure of the mammalian hippocampus – How do structural specializations relate to the evolutionary history of animals? How do structural specializations translate into behaviors that allow the animals to successfully compete in their ecological niches? We perform comparative quantitative analysis of functionally defined neuron populations that also includes neurons that are born in adult animals. Most of the animals we study are wild-living species that show unique environmental adaptations. We have been able to define anatomical patterns that characterize taxonomic groups, and within these groups, habitat requirements that can shape quantitative relations between hippocampal cell populations - revealing surprising features that only nature is able to create.

Keywords: hippocampus, behavior, adaptation, phylogeny, stereology, immunohistochemistry, neurogenesis

Topic: Neural Basis of Behavior

Publications: pubmed

 

   
Margarete Arras

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PD Dr. med. vet. Margarete Arras
Center for Clinical Research, Division of Surgical Research, University Hospital Zurich
margarete.arras@usz.ch
Research Focus: Pain in rodents is still a contradictory topic. Currently only few reliable indicators exist to detect low and middle grade pain in the mouse. As the diagnosis of pain is the basis of effective analgesic treatment for animals used in biomedical research, the analgesic regimens currently used for mice often do not meet the needs of this species. We therefore work on the development of reliable and sensitive indicators in different pain models and use our pain indicators to test and adjust analgesic regimens for mice undergoing diverse experimental procedures.

Methods used: Telemetric recordings of physiological parameters, observations of species typical behaviours in the home cage, analyses of activity and circadian rhythm, behavioural tests e.g. burrowing test, analgesiometric and pharmacokinetic investigations.

Keywords: Pain, refinement, analgesia, behavior, mouse

Topic: Neural Basis of Behavior

Publications: pubmed

Website: http://www.chir.uzh.ch/anesthesia.html

   
Ayaz Asli

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Dr. Asli Ayaz
Brain Research Institute, University of Zurich
ayaz@hifo.uzh.ch

Research Focus: We perceive the outside world as a result of continuous sensorimotor interactions. We guide our gaze to what we want to look at; we choose and approach what to touch smell or taste.  In addition our motor actions are carried out in the light of sensory inputs. Our research focuses on understanding how sensory inputs are integrated with motor actions to produce a unified percept. We specifically investigate sensorimotor circuitry of somatosensation during active exploratory behavior in head-restrained mobile mice. We use 2-photon calcium imaging to measure neuronal activity and benefit from viral and genetic constructs to dissect and manipulate the circuitry.

Keywords: sensory processing, locomotion, in vivo physiology, optical imaging, sensorimotor integration, neural circuits

Topics: Sensory systems, Neural basis of behavior

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/asliayazhomepage/home

 

   
B      
Dominik Bach

 

Prof. Dr. phil. Dr. med. Dominik R. Bach
Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich
dominik.bach@uzh.ch

Research Focus:  Emotions are adaptive response syndromes that exist in humans, and non-human animals. Our knowledge on the molecular and neuronal basis of defensive emotions such as panic, learned fear, and anxiety, mainly comes from animal research. Yet, animal models of emotion are not directly comparable to human emotion. The challenge that our lab seeks to address is to translate established animal models of emotion to humans, by creating and investigating behavioural cross-species test beds. We are particularly interested in a computational formulation of aversive learning (fear conditioning), anxiety, and other defensive behaviours. To this end, we use structural and functional MRI, MEG, peripheral physiology, behavioural experiments, and computational modelling.

Keywords: Emotions, comparative neuroscience, computational modelling, fear conditioning, anxiety

Topics: Neural Basis of Behavior, Cognitive Neuroscience, Computation and Modeling

Publications: pubmed

Website: http://bachlab.org

 

   
Bachmann Ruxandra

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Dr. med. Ruxandra Bachmann-Gagescu
Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zurich
ruxandra.bachmann@imls.uzh.ch

Research Focus: Our research focuses on a group of human Mendelian disorders called ciliopathies which are unified by shared genetic causes resulting in primary cilium dysfunction. Primary cilia are small non-motile organelles present on the surface of most vertebrate cells where they are involved in transduction of sensory, mechanical or chemical signals and in regulation of signalling pathways during development and cell homeostasis. Typical clinical presentations of ciliopathies include neurological involvement, retinal degeneration and renal fibrocystic disease, as illustrated by Joubert syndrome (JS), an iconic ciliopathy which is the main focus of our research. To understand the consequences of mutations in JS-associated genes at the molecular level, we combine observations from human genetics studies on JS-patients with modelling in the zebrafish system using state-of-the-art techniques such as crispr/Cas9 genome editing or live imaging of transgenically-tagged ciliary proteins.

Keywords: ciliopathies, primary cilia, Joubert syndrome, zebrafish

Topics: Development and Regeneration, Disorders of the nervous system

Website: http://www.medgen.uzh.ch/en/forschung/Research-Group-Bachmann-Gagescu.html

 

   
baumann

 

Prof. Dr. Christian Baumann

Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich
christian.baumann@usz.ch

 

Topic: Sleep and Sleep Disorders

Website: http://www.neurologie.usz.ch/forschung/seiten/epilepsie-und-schlaf.aspx

 

   
Becher Burkhard

 

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Burkhard Becher
Institute of experimental Immunology, University of Zurich
becher@immunology.uzh.ch

Research Focus: Neuro- and Tumorimmunology

Our research aims to understand the development of tissue-specific autoimmunity in particular in the context of interactions of the nervous system with the immune system. Our main research interests can be categorized as such:

  • Cytokine networks in autoimmune inflammatory disease with a focus on in vivo modeling of multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, graft-versus host disease
  • Immune tolerance and lymphoid development
  • Tumorimmunology: specifically the interaction of immune cells with cancer cells and therapeutic interventions to mount immune responses against tumors

Keywords: Transgenic mice, cytokines, immunity

Topic: Disorders of the Nervous System

Publications: pubmed

Website: http://www.immunology.uzh.ch/en/researchunit/inflammationresearch/team/becher.html
 

   
benke

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PD Dr. Dietman Benke

Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zurich
benke@pharma.uzh.ch

Research Focus: GABAB receptors control neuronal excitability by mediating slow inhibitory neurotransmission. They are involved in virtually all main brain functions and have been implicated in numerous neurological disorders making them attractive drug targets. Our research focuses on the regulation of GABAB receptors by trafficking mechanisms and interacting proteins under normal and pathological conditions. Our ultimate goal is to uncover mechanisms of GABAB receptor dysregulation in disease states and use this information for designing novel therapeutic strategies. Current projects concentrate on the regulation of GABAB receptor cell surface expression by phosphorylation, ubiquitination and interacting proteins and its contribution to neuronal plasticity. In addition, we explore the potential to prevent downregulation of GABAB receptors in cerebral ischemia with small synthetic peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions as a novel neuroprotective strategy.

Keywords: GABAB receptor, trafficking, plasticity, neurological disorders

Topic: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience

Publications: pubmed

Website: http://www.pharma.uzh.ch/research.html

 

     
Bergamini